Shemini Atzeret 2020 will begin in the evening of Friday, October 09th and ends in the evening of Sunday, October 11th

Friday, October 9th, 2020 – Light Shabbat / Holiday Candles at 6:06 PM

Saturday, October 10th, 2020 – Light Holiday Candles after 7:03 PM

Sunday, October 11, 2020 – Holiday Ends 7:02 PM

Governor Cuomo Announced Indoor Dining in New York City Allowed to Resume Beginning September 30 with 25 Percent Occupancy Limit.

The following seating options are available:

a) Seating inside a closed sukkah
b) Outdoor seating – outside the sukkah
c) Outdoor seating – outside the sukkah but may use our designated sukkah used only for conducting the blessings.
d) Indoor seating

Needless to say, 6 feet distancing will be strictly maintained.

For over 18 years, Talia’s Steakhouse and Bar, the premier Glatt Kosher restaurant located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, NYC, has been offering pre-paid, prix fixe, Glatt Kosher Shemini Atzeret lunch and dinner menu options – all inclusive. The energy, romantic ambiance, and Glatt Kosher gourmet cuisine at Talia’s Steakhouse & Bar make it the ideal spot to celebrate Shemini Atzeret. It is non-communal dinner with private tables for you and your family and friends.


 

six-feet-social-distancing-talias-steakhouse

Talia’s takes all precautions to strictly abide by the food safety standards set by the CDC, FDA and DOH. Social distancing, also called “physical distancing” means maintaining a safe distance between yourself and others not from your household. To practice physical distancing, Talia’s makes sure that you stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from other people who are not from your household that will also be dining in Talia’s outdoor seatings. All tables can have a maximum of 6 guests guests.


Bring your friends and family and enjoy Talia’s Yom Tov meals. Since Jewish law allows cooking on Yom Tov, which doesn’t fall on Shabbat, you can indulge in a sizzling steak right off the grill while sipping mixed drinks from Talia’s full bar such as vodka cranberry, apple or chocolate martinis, cosmopolitans, etc.  Shemini Atzeret dinner includes challah roll, wine for kiddush and unlimited soda, coffee or tea.


Pre-Paid Shemini Atzeret Yom Tov Lunch & Dinner Menus

First Night, Friday, October 9th – First Sitting: 5:00 PM – 7:45 PM

First Night, Friday, October 9th – Second Sitting: 8:00 PM – 10:45 PM 

Second Night, Saturday, October 10th – First Sitting: 5:00 PM – 7:45 PM 

Second Night, Saturday, October 10th – Second Sitting: 8:00 PM – 10:45 PM 

As of today, per NYC new guidelines, all Manhattan restaurants shall be closed at 11 pm.

Dinner Menus 


Option 1 – $68

To View Menu, CLICK HERE

Pre-paid Shemini Atzeret Dinner Option 1 Order Online, CLICK HERE 

Option 2 – $85

To View Shemini Atzeret – Menu, CLICK HERE

Pre-paid Shemini Atzeret Dinner Option 2 Order Online, CLICK HERE

 


Yom Tov Shabbat Lunch Menu – October 10th:

12PM – 3:00PM – Lunch

Talia’s will be open on Shabbat lunch during Shemini Atzeret (Oct 10th) only for a group of 18 guests (sitting in 3 tables – 6 guests in each table, with six feet distancing) and more. For more information, please call us at 212 580-3770.

Shemini Atzeret Shabbat Lunch Menu Option 1 – $64 – Click Here

Shemini Atzeret Shabbat Lunch Menu Option 2 – $75 – Click Here

Yom Tov Lunch Menu – October 11th:

12PM – 3:00PM – Lunch

Talia’s will be open on Shabbat lunch during Shemini Atzeret (Oct 10th) only for a group of 18 guests (sitting in 3 tables – 6 guests in each table, with six feet distancing) and more. For more information, please call us at 212 580-3770.

Shemini Atzeret Lunch Menu Option 1 – $49 – Click Here

Shemini Atzeret Lunch Menu Option 2 – $64 –  Click Here

Sunday Night Dinner with Live Music – October 4th – Yom Tov ends at 7:13 pm. Live Jazz starts at 8:00 `pm. Outdoor seating only.

Talia’s Bar will be open about 15 min after Yom Tov.

Talia’s will serve dinner at about 30 min after Yom Tov

NOTE: The above zemanim information is applicable to New York.
Talia’s proudly earned the “A” letter grade from the NYC Department of Health.
For further questions call 212-580-3770.
Menus are subject to change without notice.


What is Shmini Atzeret?

Shemini Atzeret, meaning “the eighth day of assembly,” is a Biblical Jewish holiday that follows the Jewish festival of Sukkot. It is written: “On the eighth day you should hold a solemn gathering; you shall not work at your occupation” (Numbers 29:35).
Shemini Atzeret marks the beginning of the rainy season following the harvest in Israel. The prayer for rain, Tefilat Geshem, is the only ritual that is unique to Shemini Atzeret.


In ancient times, an offering was brought to the Temple in Jerusalem on Shemini Atzeret. But once the Temple was destroyed, the only Shemini Atzeret ritual that remained was the liturgy requesting rain for a plentiful year.
After the prayer for rain is recited on Shemini Atzeret, the phrase Masheev HaRuach U-Moreed HaGeshem (He causes the wind to blow and the rain to fall) is inserted into the Amidah prayer until Passover. Ashkenazi Jews recite the Memorial Prayer, Yizkor, on Shemini Atzeret. Even though Shemini Atzeret immediately follows the festival of Sukkot, it is a totally separate holiday. A new Shehechiyanu blessing is recited.


And if one sits in the Sukkah on Shemini Atzeret, the prayer recited for sitting in the Sukkah is not recited. Since the completion of the annual cycle of Torah readings occurred around the time of Shemini Atzeret, a rabbinical tradition developed in the Middle Ages to celebrate the Torah on Shemini Atzeret.
This celebration came to be known as Simchat Torah.


Simchat Torah celebrates – with joyful processions, singing and dancing – the ending of one cycle of Torah reading and the beginning of a new cycle. Today in the Diaspora, Simchat Torah is celebrated on the second day of Shemini Atzeret.
It is common for Jews in the Diaspora to refer to the first day as Shemini Atzeret and to the second day as Simchat Torah. In Israel, Simchat Torah is celebrated on the first and only day of Shemini Atzeret. The holiday is referred to as both Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah. To learn more about Shemini Atzeret Click HERE  or HERE

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